Unpacking your package: getting to grips with the male reproductive system

Written by Mojo, medically reviewed
by Dr Matthew Chan, Medical Doctor

Man wearing a bright yellow shirt sat on his bed smiling at the camera

Our bodies are so complicated, especially downstairs. And when it comes to the male reproductive system, most of us only know the basics of what we have and how it works. 

We reckon it’s time to change all that. 

So today we’re taking a trip around your tackle, and meeting some of the unsung heroes hidden within your pants.

The function of the penis

This well oiled machine has some pretty important stuff to do. No doubt, you’ll be very familiar with these functions below:

  1. Urination:
    •  carrying pee out of the body
  2. Sexual function:
    •  getting an erection
    •  ejaculation (carrying sperm out of your body), which is also key to reproduction

These might seem like simple tasks, but they’re only made possible by a complex web of body parts, working together to perform the right tasks at the right time. 

What’s involved? Glad you asked.

A guided tour of the male reproductive system

  1. The penis, which is made up of several parts
  2. The penis shaft surrounds the urethra (the tube which pee and cum move through) and is connected to the pubic bone
  3. The glans (aka the head) is the bulbous area at the end of penis that’s shaped like a bell 
  1. Between the shaft and the glans is the penis crown (that rounded border that projects from the base of the head really does put the crown in your crown jewels)
  2. The foreskin is the hood of loose skin which covers the head of the penis. Some people have their foreskin removed, often as babies or later in life for various medical or religious reasons. This is called circumcision
  1. The frenulum (aka the banjo string) is found on the underside of the penis, connecting the foreskin to the head of the penis. This is also known as the banjo string (but it only goes to folk festivals when you do)
  2. The scrotum (aka the ball sack or balls) is the sack of skin which hangs outside the body at the base of the penis holding the testicles. The beauty of your ball sack is it keeps your sperm at the right temperature. For sperm to remain healthy, it should stay roughly 4 degrees below normal body temperature
  3. The testicles (aka the testes) are two egg shaped glands found inside the scrotum. They produce sperm and the hormone testosterone, which is responsible for the male characteristics
  1. The cremaster muscle also helps regulate the temperature of your load. When it’s cold it contracts to pull the scrotum and testicles closer to the body (quick dip in the sea spring to mind?). When it’s warm, it relaxes and allows the scrotum and testicles to hang further away from the body (sweaty festival memories, anyone?)
  2. The epididymis is behind the top of each testicle. It feels like a soft, coiled tube. This is where sperm matures (like a fine wine) but it’s also a common place where cysts and lumps can develop. These are most often benign, but they can be a sign of testicular cancer. So remember to cover this area when checking your balls.
  1. The seminal vesicles produce semen and are located below the bladder
  2. The vas deferens is a long, narrow tube that carries sperm from the epididymis to the seminal vesicles when ejaculation happens
  3. The urethra runs along the inside of the penis shaft and carries urine out of the body from the bladder. During ejaculation, the urethra also carries semen out of the body from the testicles
  4. The urinary meatus (aka the pee hole) is the opening where pee (and cum) leave the body
  1. The prostate gland produces a fluid that helps sperm survive. It’s roughly the size of a walnut, and can be sensitive to pressure in a way that many people find pleasurable. Stimulating the prostate can also help you ejaculate
  2. The Cowper’s glands produce ‘warm up’ fluid called pre-ejaculate or precum, which prepares and cleans the urethra for ejaculation. The Cowper’s glands live just under the prostate and attach to the urethra

Now you’ve learned about the male reproductive system, why not check your balls?

Knowing more about your reproductive system can help you stay healthy and enjoy better sex as well. 

We’ve found understanding the many connections between your mind, body and sex organs has helped countless guys keep their erections in shape, and opened them up to stronger orgasms too. 

But the benefits don’t end there. Having a strong understanding of how your package feels, and knowing what’s normal for you could actually save your life. Read these 3 simple steps, to help you check your balls for testicular cancer. It only takes a minute, we promise. 

Final tip: why not time it to payday? A topped up bank balance and normal feeling balls = kerching!  

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Mojo aims to provide useful wellbeing resources to its users; however, you should not solely rely on opinions or advice available on the Website or given by the Community. Always seek advice from a qualified medical doctor or other healthcare professional before acting.